Naro Notables

Posts Tagged ‘Sales and marketing transformation’

Two Key Elements to Successful Sales and Marketing Transformation

If you want to read  a great success story about a high-profile sales and marketing transformation effort, check out this article about  Sungard in the publication Selling Power. There are two key elements of this story I find consistent with other successful sales transformation efforts. The first is that there is an “advocate”, someone who is vested heavily in the outcome of the project, and secondly, the company is leveraging change management practices.

The executives at Sungard realize they have to change in order to grow market share. The initial self assessment is very hard, especially when you are a $1 billion plus company. For advocates, it’s also clear that the more work you do up front regarding change management the easier it is to get support and funding for a project. If you are ready to get started on your own self assessment, visit the Naro Group Knowledge Center and read the article entitled, “Self Assessment for Driving Revenue Growth.” Or if you are ready to create your own sales and marketing transformation, check out these consultation options I offer for driving optimal sales performance.

 

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Marketing and Sales Going Mobile

I attended a great session last night put on by SMEI – Boston regarding “mobile” as part of marketing and sales planning. The discussion lead to understanding mobile as very useful in solving “pinpoint” problems not only in the B-to-C world, like point-of-sale solutions and health care management, but also in B-to-B world around supply chain management and inventory control. There were lots of great examples from small businesses to large pharmaceuticals and construction applications. My big takeaway, really, there IS an App for that … almost whatever you can imagine. But the formula for success is clear, as stated by Lori Cohen of Mobiquity, “focus on [the] user experience” as part of your mobile strategy. It also goes without saying, solve a specific problem that either drives efficiency or increases productivity, which will lead to driving other business goals such as customer satisfaction, and revenue growth.

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Here’s a Workshop You Won’t Want to Miss!

Join me and other senior sales, marketing, and operational executives on September 11 in Lexington, MA for a half-day workshop that promises to help you find ways to improve revenue performance.

Sponsored by Sales & Marketing Executives International (SMEI), this workshop will help you recognize what is keeping your sales organization from driving an ideal level of performance. You will uncover where the performance gaps are that deter revenue generation at the organizational level and be equipped with tools to close the gaps by the time the workshop ends.

During the workshop, I will share with you a sales and marketing transformation framework and a self-assessment process that will help you:

  • Establish what business results you want to drive
  • Identify sales and marketing objectives needed to achieve results
  • Determine which metric-driven activities will help you meet objectives
  • Assess sales readiness and enablement capabilities
  • Understand the value of potential initiatives
  • Review change management fundamentals

Since space is limited for this workshop, I recommend that you reserve your seat today.

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Managing Selling Activities Versus Revenue Results

I recently read “Cracking the Sales Management Code: The Secrets to Measuring and Managing Sales Performance” by Jason Jordan and Michelle Vazzana. The authors present a central premise that is so obvious but it’s one I see routinely ignored in sales management: You can’t manage to revenue results. Or, as one of the selling programs I use says, “Relying on revenue results to learn about sales problems helps you discover that you are too late to fix them.”

I believe sales leaders are conditioned this way because they are managed to revenue results. And that’s the way they then in turn manage down. A good example is when a sales manager pressures his or her staff people into committing to a public revenue number during monthly or quarterly sales meetings. The reality is, if sales cycles are four months or more, those results are already pretty much determined. So what’s the point?

In fact, most sales are won or lost in the first one or two calls, right at the very beginning of the sales cycle. So, shouldn’t management focus its efforts on making sure sales people are doing the right things early in the sales cycle? This is where sales people can best position themselves, your offerings, and your company with buyers in your target markets. Isn’t that what really should be shared with the rest of the sales team – the activities that lead to results?

Unfortunately, I think it’s easier to manage to results than dig down and understand any real correlation between activities and revenue results. I know firsthand working with clients that the myriad of pipeline reports, forecasts, and dashboards just adds to the frustration of identifying what’s really important to focus on for improved performance.

The authors of the book do a very good job of bringing order to the sometimes chaotic world of sales and business performance measurement. But more important is their straightforward framework for connecting sales activities to objectives and then to business results. The concept seems simple. The difficulty is the execution when you are under the gun to produce results. I recommend you read the book and think about what you can do in your own environment to bring focus to those activities that you can better manage to achieve breakthrough results.

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Ready to Drive More Revenue?

The Naro Group's free Sales Performance Assessment uncovers revenue-blocking obstacles within your sales organization. Using the core capabilities of high-performing sales organizations as a baseline, the assessment will discover where your organization's proficiency falls short in these areas of sales effectiveness:

Sales Readiness

How quickly and efficiently are your sales people moving qualified pipeline opportunities to closure? Do your existing sales methodologies and processes fully support your sales team? Do your sales people have the skills, pipeline models, forecasting capabilities, opportunity management, and planning tools that they need to succeed? Are they engaging in the right activities throughout the sales cycle?

Sales Enablement

Do your sales people have all the intelligence they need about your products, markets, and the competition? Do they have access to the right knowledge-based support tools? Is each member of your sales team fully prepared to sell your specific offerings? Can your sales people have conversations that engage buyers and lead them into sales cycles?

Learn what gaps might be hindering your sales organization.

Schedule your free Sales Performance Assessment now. Call The Naro Group at 603.881.7712 or email us today.